Old photos
Sir Robert Philp
Tree Report
History of a Street Name
Opening of Toowong Library
Railway Station c.1900
Sisters of Mercy
Poster - Sale of the Glen Olive Garden Estate from 1924
Significant Toowong Tree Report
Latest Newsletter
Local Area Plan
19th century map-West Toowong
HISTORY UNDER THREAT

 

We are hoping to add to our local knowledge by gathering information regarding the history behind the Toowong street names (or former name).

If you have further thoughts or can confirm or correct the information below, then please e-mail sue@smartype.com.au. Your help would be appreciated.

A    
Annerley Street    
Archer Street   Archer Street is named after Alexander Archer the Bank of New South Wales manager, part of the Rockhampton Archer family. His house Arley. John Bray
Ascog Terrace   Perhaps from the following??
1] Ascog Hall was built in 1844 by the Rev. James Monteith of Dalkeith who moved to Bute at the time of the Disruptions, when he joined the Free Church.
2] "ASCOG, bay, village, lake, and estate on east side of Bute Island, Buteshire. The bay is about 1 1/2 miles south-east of Rothesay. The estate, with mansion, was sold in 1876 for £39,420." [From The Gazetteer of Scotland, by Rev. John Wilson, 1882.]
3] Asc Askr (Old Norse), an ash. Ascaig Ascog
Augustus Street  

Most likely named after Sir Augustus Charles Gregory who lived at Rainworth House which now faces Barton Street Rainworth.

Gregory Street is almost a straight line from his house to the Town Council chambers. He was endearingly referred to as 'Gregory of Rainworth' after receiving his knighthood.

     
B    
Ballara Lane    
Bent Street    
Broseley Road   Wasn't there a Brosely House and a farm by that name on early maps? There used to be a rambling old house where the group of new houses stand next to the park at the foot of Sussex Street. John Bray
Bywong Street    
     
C    
Camp Street    
Clayton Lane    
Coram Lane    
     
D    
Dampier Street    
Dean Street    
Dempster Street   The Dempster family had a house in Kapundra Street, they originally owned the land there abouts and it was a dairy farm.
Devon Street    
Dovercourt Road   Named when the Dovercourt land was subdivided in 1919 by B. Palmer (son of Sir Arthur Palmer). Dovercourt is still standing.
J.&J. Bigge, Dovercourt.
Duke Street    
     
E    
Elizabeth Street    
Emerson Street    
Explorer Street  

Sir Augustus Charles Gregory

Born: 1 August 1819 England. Died: 25 June 1905. Gregory was leader of the North Australian Exploring Expedition 1854-58 and Surveyor-General of Queensland 1859. His work relates to Australian geology and natural history as well as surveying. John Bray

This book is worth including in the 'further reading' section. HARD COUNTRY, HARD MEN In the Footsteps of Gregory Kieran Kelly Foreword by Janet Holmes a Court $24.95,Trade pbk, 288 pp, ISBN 0 86806 715 6

Sir Augustus Charles Gregory is arguably Australia's greatest explorer.

His 1855-56 North Australia Expedition was brilliantly led, produced the final pieces in the jig-saw map of Australia, solved the riddle of the inland sea, resulted in no loss of life, produced some of the greatest colonial art of the nineteenth century and made a prodigious contribution to the understanding of Australian botany.

In this book Kelly has intertwined Gregory's narrative with his own experience of mounting and conducting an expedition in 1999 along Northern Territory's Victoria River. Kelly believes that the Australian identity epitomised by the Anzacs was forged in the hardship of the Australian bush. Janet Holmes a Court, in her foreword to Kelly's book calls it: pragmatic acceptance of the heroic in the day-to-day ... and the grit to turn dreams into reality, which she sees both in Augustus Gregory and in Kieran Kelly's trek across her 'backyard'.

     
F    
Fewings Street  

Named after Fewings who owned Karslake. See Fewings Memoirs.

Fewings owned the large house on the left in Sherwood Road before you get to Miskin Street. John Bray, President, Bardon Community Association.

JB Fewings, headmaster of the Petrie-Terrace School and chronicler of life in early Toowong. (Helen Gregory, Brisbane History Group, Papers No.9)

Frederick Street   Mr Ray Wall's grandparents William and Janet were the first to settle in what is now called Frederick Street. It was named after their first son, Frederick, who was born in 1891. (Mr Wall)
     
G    
Gower Street    
Grove Cr   Sherwood Road and Grove Street were named for the house Sherwood Grove, which is a reference to the legendary Sherwood Forest. (Helen Gregory, Brisbane History Group, Papers No.9)
Gregory Street  

Most likely named after Sir Augustus Charles Gregory who lived at Rainworth House which now faces Barton Street Rainworth. Gregory Street is almost a straight line from his house to the Town Council chambers. He was endearingly referred to as 'Gregory of Rainworth' after receiving his knighthood. John Bray

Also Gregory Park Milton and maybe Gregory Terrace and Gregory River. His brother was an explorer in Western Australia so many landmarks bear the family name. John Bray

This book is worth including in the 'further reading' section. HARD COUNTRY, HARD MEN In the Footsteps of Gregory Kieran Kelly Foreword by Janet Holmes a Court $24.95,Trade pbk, 288 pp, ISBN 0 86806 715 6

     
K    
Kerr Street   Kerr Street was subdivided in 1903 (approx.). It was named after Rev. Kerr who was in Stanthorpe when I was a child. D.C. Cowley
     
H    
High Street  

Originally called Moggill Road.

Moggill Road originally started in the central City but got called "The River Road" which later became Coronation Drive after the Coronation of King George and the section in Toowong Village became High Street when the ornamental planting was done up the centre so it now starts at St Thomas Church. John Bray, President, Bardon Community Association.

Howitt Street    
Hunter Street   Possibly named after Sir Arthur Hunter Palmer KCMG. The titles to the surrounding land (4 Jan 1923) were owned by Mary Jessie Hunter Palmer and Estelle Georgina Hunter Palmer.
     
I    
Ivy Street   Ivy Estate was sold 7 June 1884.
     
J    
Jephson Street  

Named after Letitia Jephson who lived at Mallow. House was built by a Mr Bennett. Prue Firth

Jephson Street was previously Church Street. There were at least four churches in the street at one time. John Bray, President, Bardon Community Association.

Jones Street  

Samuel Williams Jones was born in Wales, 1838.

He arrived in Brisbane on the sailing ship "Wanata" in 1863 and married Emily Amos at Dalby in 1865. S.W. Jones established himself as a blacksmith and wheelwright in the township of Condamine 1866-78 beside the Condamine River.

A replica of his bell 6 feet in height has a plaque on each side. One plaque chronicles the history of the area from 1856 and the other tells of S. W. Jones, maker of the now famous Condamine Bells.

The monument was unveiled on 17 September 1977 to salute Jones and the pioneers that used his bells. S. W. Jones left Condamine for Toowong in 1878, and built a smithy at the rear of his shingle-roofed cottage at 23 Maryvale Street, Toowong. [Toowong Estate, Parish of Enoggera, Resub 37 of subs 45-46 of Portion 248 granted to J. C. Laycock in 1875].

Here he continued to make bells for 34 years. He died aged 88 years on 30 April 1927 and was buried in Toowong Cemetery. S. W. Jones was a councillor on Toowong Shire Council 1881-1885. John Bray

     
K    
Kapunda Street    
Keltie Street    
Kensington    
Kent Street    
     
L    
Land Street   Named after William Land, a butcher in Toowong at the time.
Landsborough Pde  

Mrs Lewis said that Landsborough Parade used to be called Paradise Avenue. She said that the lane ran behind the hotel. It could have become the road leading up to the bottle shop. According to Mrs Lewis the lane lead to the Cobb and Co Stables, which were behind the hotel.

Landsborough Pde is quite possibly named after a Miss FW Carr who lived in Burns Road and married a Mr Landsborough. John Sinclair
OR
Named after William Landsborough, explorer, who lived at Toowong in the 1870s in a house called Curragbawm. (Helen Gregory, Brisbane History Group, Papers No.9)

Old maps show it once was three Streets Paradise Avenue next to the Regatta boathouse, then Landsborough Street, then Theresa Street alongside the rail line. There never was a Cobb and Co stables behind the Regatta. The hotel was built after they lost the mail contract in 1875 to the railways and they travelled from South Brisbane via Rocklea to Ipswich. John Bray

Lodge Street   Said to be named after the gate keepers lodge for the Palmer Estate which was located in this street.
     
M    
Maraket Street    
Market Street    
Maryvale Street    
McGrath Street    
Miskin Street  

Named after WH Miskin who lived in Dovercourt for many years, (land bordering the road). J.&J. Bigge, Dovercourt.

Miskin was an early landowner in the area. In the 1950's Miskin Street was dirt, as were most streets in West Toowong. My mate lived at the foot of Miskin Street. It was great fun to watch cars sliding every where in wet weather. Billy cart racing down the street was quite a thrill. Gower Street was even better. John Bray, President, Bardon Community Association.

Moggill   Moggill Road originally started in the central City but got called "The River Road" which later became Coronation Drive after the Coronation of King George and the section in Toowong Village became High Street when the ornamental planting was done up the centre so it now starts at St Thomas Church. John Bray, President, Bardon Community Association.
Mossman Street    
Mount Street    
     
N    
Norwood Street    
     
O    
Oakman Park   The Union Athletic Club Sports Ground, part of which is now known as Oakman Park, appeared on maps and plans from the mid 1880s (McKellar plan, sheet 7, DGI). The correct name of the sports ground explains the origin of UnionStreet which runs beside it. It was usually called simply the Toowong Sports Ground by local residents. By the early 1940s the simpler name appeared in official maps and documentation and has remained; although the name Oakman Park, which dates from the 1960s and applies only to half the park, has largely obliterated the old name from general usage.
(Helen Gregory, Brisbane History Group, Papers No.9)
Okeden Street  

Okeden Street was named after the Commissioner for Police and later Protector of Aboriginees, William Edward Parry-Okeden.

His grandaughter said his biography makes brief mention of Ascog House. Perry, Charles, 1926,'A Son of Australia'. " moved to the then sparsely populated and exclusive suburb of Toowong" "close by his lifetime friend Henry Stuart of Stuartholme" Henry Stuart was godfather of her father.

The book says he lived in the house for a short period when the subdivision of the Ascog House estate was taking place. The street was named in his honour. His grandaughter is unsure of how long or when he lived in the house but guesses it was during the 1880's. Her father born in 1874, remembered living in the house. They built a very substantial home at Kedron which is now centered in a retirement community. John Bray

Orchard Street    
Oxford Road    
     
P    
Palmer Street  

Probably named after Sir Arthur Palmer, owner of the estate in the 1800s and early 1900s.

In the 1950.s there was the remnants of a derelict house where the Toowong High School now stands. The land was just overgrown bush which we called "Palmers Paddock". There were horses kept there but the house was vacant. On the other side of the Creek was a Chinese Market garden facing Vera Street, which is now included in the school grounds. John Bray, President, Bardon Community Association
Contact Arthur Beau Palmer

Patrick Lane   Would be named after AMG Patrick, who lived in a house called Clayton, then it was later used by the late JB Dixon, AV Drury, Clark of the Executive Council; JR Atkinson, Surveyor of Ipswich; AM Cooper, Manager of the Bank of Australasia and JB Fewings. Mr Patrick, once an officer in the native police force.
Pictavia Street    
Pioneer Street   Pioneer St was originally called Gregory Street and it and Explorer St were part of the Pioneer Estate. Already being a Gregory St, the name was changed to Pioneer as it was the name of the estate.
Hilda - FOTC
     
Q    
Quinn Street    
R    
Richer Street   Named after William Richer, founding minister Baptist Church, Toowong. Richer arrived in Australia in 1869, he lived in Toowong from 1875. Richer was a builder, architect and a minister. MAP (Thanks go to Jim Gibson of Indooroopilly for this information).
     
S    
Sandford Street   Sandford St, currently in St. Lucia, used to be Toowong. It was the site of Gailley's estate and then acquired by Dr Sandford Jackson (date unknown as yet). He lived in the residence built by Gailley called "Glen Olive". When Jackson retired from the hospital as Registrar, he sold up the estate by auction.
It is called Sandford Steet now but was originally called Glen Olive Drive, because of the grove that grew there.
Sherwood Road   Sherwood Road and Grove Street were named for the house Sherwood Grove, which is a reference to the legendary Sherwood Forest. (Helen Gregory, Brisbane History Group, Papers No.9)
Sleath Street   I believe SLEATH STREET is in Toowong - at least it was when I was a kid of 8 - 14 roaming the area on my bike. (Sleath Street is located off Frederick Street).
Sleath Street was named after Henry Walter Sleath: Henry apparantly had a music business in George Street (city) in the late 1800's, where he and family lived before moving to Glenn Rd Toowong. In 1881 he was elected as a councillor for Toowong. Two streets were named after him - Sleath Street in Toowong and Sleath Street in Ormiston. Source:
q
Koss Siwers
Soudan Street  

You are probably aware that the Toowong Street got named around the time of the relief of Khartoum. It probably was the centrepiece of a Soudan Estate. Part of the land subdivided by Joshua Jeays in present Bardon, then Paddington was called the Soudan Estate.
I met a lifetime resident of Warburton Street (formerly Main Street) who said her address 1920's was written as Main Street, Soudan Estate, Paddington. You will have seen streets in Gordon Park have names such as Khartoum,Victoria and Gordon. John Bray

Soudan Street on the Ivy Estate (in the West Toowong area) which was first advertised for sale in 1884, is the old spelling of the Sudan in Africa (Ivy Estate plan, JOL). (Helen Gregory, Brisbane History Group, Papers No.9)

Stanley Terrace   Francis Drummond Greville Stanley lived in what become Stanley Terrace for a while in a house called Ormlie which he built in about 1869 (Fewings, letter 9). Stanley later moved to the Kensington Terrace Area. Ormlie became known as Easton Grey when it was owned by the squatter-politician Sir Arthur Hunter Palmer, premier of Queensland 1870-74. The Easton Grey estate was sub-divided in the late 1880s (Easton Grey Estate plan, JOL). It seems most likely that Stanley Terrace was named for FDG Stanley and not for his brother, Henry Charles Stanley, the railways engineer, who lived further west in Toowong before moving to Tighnabruaich in Indooroopilly in the early 1890s. (Helen Gregory, Brisbane History Group, Papers No.9)
St. Osyth   Perhaps from here???
1] St. Osyth is a parish within the Tendring District Council administrative area and in the County of Essex. The centre of the village is dominated by the medieval remains of the Priory on its 383 acres of land, building of which began in the year 1118.
Sussex Street    
Sylvan Road  

Previously known as Cemetery Road. Leigh Chamberlain

Sylvan Road ran from a railway platform where the Scout hut is now to the cemetery gates. Coffins were unloaded of the train and taken by horse drawn hearse to the cemetery. John Bray, President, Bardon Community Association

A newspaper article in 1930 described Toowong as a 'sylvan suburb'. Not surprisingly, therefore, there is a Sylvan Road in Toowong. (Helen Gregory, Brisbane History Group, Papers No.9)

     
T    
Terrace Street    
     
V    
Vera Street   Named after the builder (Hughes) daughter Vera. My Mum told me that. Kev
     
W    
Warrawee Street   Warrawee is believed to have been built in the mid 1880s, for Albert Henry White, owner of the three acre site. E. John White, manager of the New Zealand Accident Insurance Company, was then in residence. We believe that the estate below the grand house was called "Warrawee".
Whitmore Street   John Sinclair tells us that Whitmore Street used to be called Wilson Street until the 1930s.
Wienholt Street   Quite possibly named after the original owner (as shown on map from 1887) - A. Wienholt, who owned most of the land bordered by what is now Milton Road, Birdwood Tce, Gregory Street and Wienholt Street.
Wilmac Street    
Woodstock Road    
Wool Street    

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Khartoum, Siege of

Encyclopaedia Britannica

Article (March 13, 1884ÐJan. 26, 1885), the Mahdi's siege of Khartoum, capital of the Sudan, which was defended by an Egyptian garrison under the British general Charles George (ÒChineseÓ) Gordon. The Mahdi's capture of the city and the slaughter of its defenders, including Gordon, caused a storm of public protest against the alleged inaction of the British government under Lord Salisbury.

The British government had become the prime European support of the khedive of Egypt but sought to remain aloof from the affairs of the Egyptian-ruled Sudan, especially after the Mahdi's tribesmen rose in revolt beginning in 1881. In early 1884, following a series of Mahdist victories, the British only reluctantly acquiesced in the khedive's selection of Gordon as governor-general of the Sudan. Gordon reached the capital of Khartoum on Feb. 18, 1884, and had succeeded in evacuating 2,000 women, children, and sick and wounded before the Mahdi's forces closed in on the town.

From that time, the British government's refusal of all of Gordon's requests for aid, together with Gordon's own obdurate refusal to retreat or evacuate further, made disaster virtually inevitable. The Siege of Khartoum commenced on March 13, but not until August, under the increasing pressure of British public opinion and Queen Victoria's urgings, did the government at last agree to send a relief force under General Garnet Joseph Wolseley, setting out from Wadi Halfa (October 1884). After learning of two victories won by Wolseley's advancing forces, the Mahdi's troops were on the verge of raising the siege; but the further unaccountable delay of the relief force encouraged them to make a final, successful assault at a gap in the ramparts caused by the falling of the Nile's waters. The city's garrison was butchered, Gordon with it. The forerunners of the relief force, consisting of river gunboats under Lord Charles Beresford, arrived off the city on January 28, two days too late, and, after a brief gun duel with the Mahdist defenders, retreated downriver.

Soon after, the Mahdi abandoned Khartoum and made Omdurman his capital.